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28 Robert WoodJohnson
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MEDICINE
The Clinic Moves Forward
B
y providing a regular clinic, the students have
had a huge positive impact on our clients' lives,"
says Ms. Molina. For example, not long after the
establishment of the clinic, she was able to discontinue the
practice of having an ambulance outside the door during
soup kitchen hours, ready to deal with health emergencies.
Education, prevention, intervention, and regular care have
eliminated that need.
Although its basic concepts have stayed the same, The
Promise Clinic has evolved. In 2014, it moved from St. John's
to the Eric B. Chandler Health Center, owned and operated
by Robert Wood Johnson Medical School: "a new home in
an extraordinary medical school setting," says Dr. Jahn. At
Chandler, patients are seen in 10 examining rooms and have
better access to specialists, either at the health center or
through referrals to the hospital. The clinic now uses elec-
tronic record keeping and has introduced a system that
allows patients to fill prescriptions using vouchers at a local
pharmacy.
Interdisciplinary care has expanded with the addition of
PharmD candidates from Rutgers Ernest Mario School of
Pharmacy, plus students from the Rutgers Physician
Assistant Program and the Rutgers School of Social Work.
In addition, the new Spanish interpreter program promotes
communication in a city where 60 percent of the residents
speak Spanish at home.
With the clinic stronger than ever, the steering committee
is looking ahead. It still hopes to serve as many clients of the
soup kitchen as possible. To increase the multidisciplinary
nature of the clinic, the Rutgers School of Nursing and other
schools at Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences may
come on board as well.
"It's exciting to think that The Promise Clinic is changing
medical education, helping to build a new generation of doc-
tors, and making a difference in the community," says
Stephanie Oh.
"We've moved on in our careers," adds Dr. Askie, a
second-year resident in family medicine. "But we'll never
forget that experience. I often find myself wondering how
my patient is doing and where she is now."
Left, middle: Robert Mason, social services coordinator, Elijah's Promise,
and Yvette Molina, director of community services, Elijah's Promise.
Left, bottom: Tito Mantilla (standing), communications committee chair
and certified Spanish interpreter, with (seated, left to right) Sanjay
Jumani, student doctor and manager, and Rutgers School of Social Work
students Sarah Livingstone, Vanessa Ferreira, and Suzanne Haggerty.
M
M
"
PHOTOS
BY:
STEVE
HOCKSTEIN